The Temple of the Crystal Timekeeper

Temple of the crystal timekeeper ingramspark cover (1)Fiona Ingram’s latest book in the middle grade series, The Chronicles of the Stone, follows the intrepid adventurers to Mexico and The Temple of the Crystal Timekeeper. Adam, Justin, and Kim are searching now for the third stone of power, and as always, they must find the stone before the villainous Dr. Khalid can get his hands on it–and them. But there’s an added twist to this tale, a warlord who believes himself the incarnation of an Aztec god. And he’s right in the thick of this adventure!

And so in this third book, the Aztecs come into play along with the Mayans.  From the beginning, when our trio’s plane crashes into the forest, until the end and the life and death game-changing action, there’s a ton of history, religion, and culture to soak up!

Lucky Fiona Ingram to have a book release on a subject that everyone’s talking about now! I was watching a riveting public TV documentary series about Mexico and there on the screen was a cenote (a sinkhole resulting from the collapse of limestone) and I literally sat up from my usual half-reclining position of viewing. I’d just read all about a cenote in The Temple of the Crystal Timekeeper! And next came Tezcatlipoca, the Aztec god, and the temple ruins deep in the forests. Hold on! I know all about Tezcatlipoca! And then came…hey! I see what you’re doing and it’s not going to work.

Read The Temple of the Crystal Timekeeper for yourself!

 

The Temple of the Crystal Timekeeper is available to purchase on Amazon.com. 

 

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Fiona Ingram is a children’s author, but up until a few years ago, she was a journalist and editor. Something rather unexpected sparked her new career as an author—a family trip to Egypt with her mother and two young nephews. They had a great time and she thought she’d write them a short story as a different kind of souvenir…. Well, one book and a planned book series later, she had changed careers.

 

 

You can find Fiona at –

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/secretofthesacredscarab/

Website: www.chroniclesofthestone.com

Twitter: http://twitter.com/FionaRobyn

Author Site: http://www.FionaIngram.com

 

The Temple of the Crystal Timekeeper is a hefty read but there’s plenty of action to keep the story moving. If you want to sneak in that Social Studies unit on Mexico and the Aztecs and Mayans, especially for your reluctant guy readers, here’s the book to do it. And check out Fiona’s website for more information about the story, as well as additional resource material to download for free.

 

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A Keeper for the Picture Book Writer

eves-bookBecause I host writer’s workshops for kidlit writers, I often meet folks who are interested in self-publishing their picture books.

Some writers are just not interested in waiting years for a traditional publisher. They’ve poured their hearts and writing souls into a manuscript and they want to see it in a book, sometimes for family and friends, and sometimes, the dream is bigger. Still, producing a picture book—a good picture book—and getting that book into the hands of readers, is not exactly child’s play. And so these writers ask me about self-publishing their picture books and I have very little good advice or resources to offer. I’ve just never come across a good how-to for those PB writers who may not have a lot of experience in design or publishing.

And then Eve Heidi Bine-Stock asked if I’d take a look at her recently released book, How To Self-Publish a Children’s Picture Book (The Easy and Inexpensive Way to Create a Book and Ebook for Non-Designers).

Would I? Here was a book specifically addressing the needs of the writer who wanted to produce a picture book. I couldn’t wait to read it!

And here’s what I loved about this book (and I’m going to do a list because you know I love lists, too):

  1. It’s easy to read, easy to understand. Yes, you’re going to be introduced to everything you’d possibly need to know about the publishing world but she explains every term, every step along the way. It really is a manageable process to learn how to publish a picture book!
  2. There are a ton of illustrations! I like illustrations; I’m a visual learner. It takes the guesswork out of the process, and I like that, too.
  3. Eve has done all the legwork for you, comparing the big things like prices and publishers. But she’s done the homework on the little things, too, like fonts. She covers it all.

This is a book for the writer who’s a do-it-yourself type, who wants to use a print-on-demand publisher and save money. So if you’re thinking of self-publishing your picture book, you don’t need to spend your time chasing down information from one link to another or in books on self-publishing in general. Eve Heidi Bine-Stock has the specifics you want in one great primer, How To Self-Publish A Children’s Picture Book.

And yes, I often give away my writing how-to books after I review ‘em, but sorry, y’all. I’ve got a couple of picture books of my own—this one’s a keeper! (You can get your own copy here, either in paperback or an ebook. And happy self-publishing!)

 

 

Friday’s Fun Find: WILD THINGS!

wild-things-cover-214x300Sometimes, an act of mischief happens along and you end up sending out a blog post accidentally.

(Um…oopsies.)

But other times, an act of mischief has to do with children’s literature and Wild Things, the book (and website) that reveals “secret lives, scandalous turns, and some very funny surprises” about the books you grew up with and loved to bits.

Betsy Bird, Julie Danielson, and Peter D. Sieruta gathered all these scathingly brilliant anecdotes (and included a few leftovers for us on the website!) so we can all enjoy a little kidlit mischief.

(Um…without sending blog goofs out into the world–)

Got a Book In You? Read This Book First

There are lots and lots of books about writing.

Good ones, too, like Anne Lamott’s Bird by Bird, and Stephen King’s On Writing. And glancing over at my bookcase, I could list a dozen more. But I don’t know whether any of them would have yellow highlighter markings on every page like Steven James’ Story Trumps Structure.

It’s just that every page–every single page–has a gem that I need to remember, a sentence or two that I feel would be better written on a poster and stuck up on the bulletin board above my desk. But I don’t have time or room to make that many posters. So I highlight and re-read and question myself and my story as I work through each chapter, hoping that all the good writing stuff is sinking in and will show up in this latest manuscript.

To be honest, Steven James doesn’t need my recommendation. But you might. And so I couldn’t wait another day to tell you about Story Trumps Structure, even though I haven’t finished it.

Well, you’d be behind, too, if you had to stop and highlight every other line in the book.

A Bad Hair Day Turned Funny

Remember back in the summer, when I shared a submissions opportunity with you about Shaker of Margaritas: Bad Hair Day? You may recall that my sainted mother had a few issues when I “tried to write funny.” Thankfully, Linda Fisher, editor over at Mozark Press, did not.

My story, “Fluffo vs. Charlotte,” is in this newest anthology, just released! In fact, I recognized quite a few writers with stories in this anthology. And P.S. I read all the stories in the proof, and laughed out loud at how really bad a bad hair day can be. Check out this post at the Mozark Press blog for a preview of the stories (and writers you know!).

You’ll laugh, too. And as my mother’s still recuperating from her fall, I’m thinking I know just what she needs to perk up her spirits. Even if she likes the other stories way better than mine.

(You can order your A Shaker of Margaritas: A Bad Hair Day here. And you can get the Kindle edition as well. Just a quick reminder, too, that even if you do not have a Kindle, you can download for FREE  the Kindle reading app for your PC.