May is for Magic

pexels-photo-127053It’s no secret that I’ve had a spot of trouble this past year, getting my writing going. But I think I may have wandered back to the joy of words, the thrill of creating. I think that I may have found my mojo again.

Which is not to say that I’ve suddenly written up a dozen manuscripts or sold a handful of others. That’s not what mojo is about, friends. It’s about magic.

The kind of magic that happens when a batter is on a roll, seeing everything good that crosses the plate. Or when a lawyer keeps winning case after case against all odds, or even when a mom has one of those days when the kids are happy, everything in the house is working smoothly, and at the end of the day, pizza–that’s still hot when it gets to the table!

Mojo. It’s a wonderful thing when you have it in your life. So if you want to know how I got mine back–and how you can get yours back, too, in whatever you’re pursuing–then zip over to the Muffin and read all about it in “Getting Your Mojo Back.”¬†

And P.S. May all my Mom friends– in whatever way, shape, or form that takes for you– have a wonderful and mojo-filled Mother’s Day!

 

Perfection!

You are looking at the new and improved, highly organized Cathy C. Hall.

Um…let me rephrase that. You are looking at the BLOG of the new and improved, highly organized Cathy C. Hall.

Now, I’ll grant you that the blog, more or less, looks the same. I’ll even admit that on the outside, I more or less look the same. But on the inside…ah, I am a changed woman. A changed writer! And all because of this:

2017-01-17-10-16-26

And this:

2017-01-17-10-18-50

 

You can be, too. Zip over and read “Accomplish Your 2017 Writing Goals with this Perfect Solution” at the Muffin today.

(And yes, I know saying that I have the perfect solution might sound a wee bit braggy. But I can only work on one character trait at a time. Next year, I’ll tackle humility.)

Magic Ticket? Yes, Please!

ticket-1539705_1920Here’s my horoscope for today:

You’ll influence others, but more importantly, you’ll comply with self-directions. To follow your own instructions is no small deal; in fact, it’s the magic ticket and the key to getting what you want.

Which wouldn’t be so weird if my post, “The Writer’s End-of-the-Year To Do List”¬†with all kinds of instructions, didn’t just happen to be up on the Muffin.

Today.

If the universe went to all that trouble to get my attention, I think it behooves me to tackle that list. And so off I go (and I hope you’ll join me! I mean, it’s not every day that I come up with a magic ticket!)

December: The Start of Something Big

DSCN5786December seemed like the perfect time to share this quote often attributed to Picasso (but probably wrongly so. Still, it’s a fine quote, whoever said it.):

The meaning of life is to find your gift. The purpose of life is to give it away.

When it comes to writing, I suspect that I’m better at helping others bring out their gift than I am at my own work. And now that I’m a bit older and possibly wiser, I’m pretty okay with that.

When my daughter’s story was selected for Chicken Soup for the Soul’s Angels and Miracles, I was thrilled for her! And recently, she was interviewed about her story for the Atlanta Journal Constitution. She made a point of mentioning that her mother was a writer and that I’d helped her polish her story and encouraged her to send it in–and she was disappointed when none of that part of the interview was included. But that’s the way it often is when writers lend a helping pen. We don’t help others tell their story for the glory; we help because there’s a joy in seeing a writer succeed, whether it’s one story that needs to be told or the beginning of a long and successful career.

There’s purpose there, in the giving away. And a purpose here is that I shared something over at the Muffin this weekend that you might’ve missed. It’s just a little bit of writing advice but maybe it’ll be the start of something BIG for you and your writing!

Just Saying No

no-1532789_1920Gosh, it’s hard to say no, isn’t it?

I don’t mean when your three kids are little and you’ve dragged them all to the grocery store and you’re only in the first aisle and already, each of them have asked at least ten times for Gooey Candy Bars or Krispy Chocolate Cereal or Saturated-with-Sugar Soda. It’s pretty easy to say no then…well, until you get to the last aisle and your head’s about to explode from the 5,769th question and you scream, “Fine. Get the candy! Get the cereal! Get the Coke! I don’t care as long as you don’t ask me ANY MORE QUESTIONS!”

Or maybe that’s just me. Anyway, for writers, saying no is a whole ‘nother story. We take jobs we really don’t want to do, or we get involved in jobs that are so demanding that we’re losing money with all the rewrites, or we commit to a project that we know we don’t have time for. And then we’re miserable and wishing and wondering why we didn’t just say no.

I don’t have all the answers, but I had a couple of ideas that might help you the next time you want to say no–when you should say no. Take a look over at The Muffin at “Just Say No: When It’s Time To Give Up A Writing Gig.”

I mean, if you have time to take a look. Or you want to take a look. You can always say no and I won’t mind a bit!